Architectural Character of Juvenile Rehabilitation Schools

Juvenile placement in confinement settings is a typical part of every juvenile justice system.
The demand on governments to meet the responsibility of providing a safe and secure setting
for juveniles who require secure placement has increased in recent years. As the economic
development and urbanization rises in African countries so does their criminogenic potential
(Patric Igbinovia 1988). The same message was echoed in 1970 by the United Nations
Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders that said:
As any country begins to open up, outgrow its traditionalism, and respond to outside
influences or new ideas by modernizing, industrializing, and concentrating people in
certain areas, its people and particularly its younger generation seize the many new
opportunities. And in doing so, a small but progressively increasing number of them
succumb to temptations and seek illegal satisfaction through crime (Fourth United
Nations Congress, 1970).
International standards such as the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, require that
facility programs meet each individual’s spiritual, educational, emotional, recreational,
hygienic, physical and health care needs while in confinement. The atmosphere embodied in
the architectural character of the facility must ensure that juveniles are not physically or
psychologically damaged by their experience.

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