BUILDINGS’ ADAPTATIONS TO AGGREGATE QUARRYING IN NGELANI AND KATANI, MLOLONGO

Stone is, arguably, one of the most (if not, the most) popular construction material in the world. Where available in large quantities and cheaply, it is favoured for its longevity relative to other construction material like earth and timber.

If it can’t be collected on or near the surface by effortless means, stone is sought and dug out of the earth to provide building blocks, aggregate and construction finishes, among other processing uses. This, then, creates a need for stone quarries. Advancements in society create a steeper demand for infrastructural improvements. The earth is sacrificed towards this end, being the primary source for raw material used in construction. The aftermath is exactly as supposed.

Whenever mention of the term “quarry” is made, images of hostile, dusty mounds of earth and deep pits in the earth come to mind. And that is just how quarrying affects the environment Less researched, is how it affects the built forms in the surrounding. Without a guide to how building in these areas can be done, a range of trial-and-error methods each try to make the best of a bad situation.

Using case studies and data collected from an active quarrying zone, lessons will be drawn as to how buildings can be adapted to such an environment

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Fig a: Extract from Gary Larson’s The Far Side

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