TOORO TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURE. FORM, SPACE AND ORDER.

ABSTRACT.
Man’s perception of architecture is an art that has resulted from his intelligence applied to the unique human modes of life. The need for man
to protect himself from the adverse environmental parameters brought out the need for his shelter. This need, coupled with the society’s
worldview and building technology, shaped his perception of space. This thesis investigates the traditional Tooro culture, building technology
and environmental influence on the resultant built forms and use of space. The author seeks to document the Tooro traditional architecture
highlighting the cultural and architectural constants responsible for the homogenous settlement in the region.
The information presented provides a point of reference for scholars and professionals eager to learn and borrow from the traditional Tooro
culture and technology. The Kakabara village of Kyenjojo district in Western Uganda is the focus area of study due to the prevalence of
traditional architecture. Data was collected through observation, secondary sources, physical measurement and unstructured interviews with
key opinion holders of the Tooro culture. However, the data analyzed confirmed the variables established though a few inconsistencies
mainly in building technology and spatial layout were identified. Recommendations were made based on the traditional Tooro culture
and architecture that can be applied in the modern day design. This kind of analysis encourages African architects to dig deep beyond
mere form referencing and look into the deeper and enduring African science.
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