Architectural trends in Kenyan universities

The university has a deep-rooted prestige as a place of teaching, learning, and nurturing and yet it is also a place of cutting-edge science, of youth, vibrancy, and energy. ‘It is this dual nature, this concurrent adherence to tradition and innovation, which renders the physical environment of the university such a redolent, enduring, and dynamic realm’ (Coulson et.al 2015). However, it also means that the contemporary university is a highly challenging and exacting landscape to design and manage successfully. As city in miniature, it must continually respond to external political and fiscal pressures, whilst simultaneously adapting to changing pedagogies and technology (Roberts, 2014). Higher education institutions the world over are facing this and new challenges which have necessitated reforms in their management and governance styles. The rise of new stakeholders, internal factors, together with globalization and the rapid pace at which new knowledge is created and utilized are among the recent developments which challenge higher education institutions. While in the past they have responded rather slowly to changing circumstances, there is now an urgent need for them to adjust rapidly in order to fulfil their missions and the needs of other stakeholders (Jowi, 2003).
Kenyan universities are not immune to these changes and being accountable to the public they need to guarantee that they offer quality teaching research and community service to its students. They have therefore evolved to reflect the needs of communities. Many of these changes are encouraged, supported or enforced through funding and measurement systems established by the government.

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