STREETS AS ARENAS OF COMPETING INTERESTS

Spaces, especially shared ones, will have competing interests and perhaps the archetypical of these spaces is streets. Additionally, Urban Centers will constitute
the highest percentage of human living environments and especially in the so-called “Developing World”.
Architects will be called upon to design urban spaces for competing functions, and this especially in Urban Centers which are characterized by diversity of
functions. Gaining an understanding of the nature, spatial requirements and interrelation of these functions is important in-order to design spaces
commensurate to the demands of the activities. Streets are good examples of such spaces with competing functions and therefore a study of streets in light of
this is apt.
The author's interest in the subject is borne out of having being born and raised in an urban environment. It is his desire that the study will advance the cause of
appropriately housing competing interests, and more so as concerns transport related functions.
This study's objectives are first to review relevant literature regarding historical development of streets, investigating the variables that have influenced their
development and especially highlighting conflicting interests in their development. Secondly is to identify stakeholders spatial requirements in streets from
relevant literature. Thirdly is to investigate competing interests on Tom Mboya Street
The study was conducted by investigating the relevant literature. Moughtin et al (2003) consider among other things, the Modern Movements' influence on
streets, Moudon A. V (1987) explores streets as public spaces via various trends and initiatives in contemporary times and Kostof (1992, 1995) considers street
development through history. Additionally, a case study of Tom Mboya Street was done, investigating competing interests.
The study found that street from and function is impacted by a number of factors which include means of communication, culture, control of public realm,
design philosophy, public safety, public health and competing interests. Furthermore, in the 20th and 21st Century, competing interests is a key factor
impacting street form and function, where the vehicles, pedestrian's, commuter, street vendor, street vendor's customer's, shopkeeper's and street user's interests
are in competition. Critically, stakeholders (street vendor and his customer) were identified in the fieldwork as stakeholder's not captured in the majority of
Western oriented Literature reviewed. Additionally, the parties also tend to relate to each other in a co-dependent manner, such that although the interests are
competing, the functions are connected, such as was seen in transport and retail.
The interdependence presents a situation of “a system of functions” rather than stand alone functions, a fact that must then be recognized in the planning and
design of urban spaces in the local context. The street form and function must however then be suited to the various stakeholder interests. Streets are indeed
spaces of competing interests, their functions, furniture, and frontages being borne out of competing interests and conversely the street function and form can
be so adjusted to mitigate competing interests
 

Documentation : 

Calendar

M T W T F S S
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30